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Places Where it’s Christmas All Year Round

Do you wish it could be Christmas every day? We simply couldn’t grow our real Christmas trees fast enough!

If you’re brimming with yuletide spirit this month, check out these 3 festive locations where it’s Christmas all year round!

Christmas Island, Nova Scotia

This Canadian island is home to a tiny population of locals and is most famous for it’s Post Office. Every day thousands of parcels and letters are sent via the Christmas Island Post Office to be franked with the coveted Christmas Island postmark. Popular with collectors and yuletide-devotees, the unique stamp features an intricate Christmas wreath design decorated with festive baubles and a bow.

The North Pole, Alaska

GiantsantaIn a town where a real life Santa Clause presides over its residents as mayor, it really is Christmas every day. Each year groups of dedicated volunteers work to reply to thousands of letters address to ‘Santa Clause, The North Pole’ to ensure each is answered. Visitors can wander down Snowman Drive and Kris Kringle Lane when they come to visit the town’s Santa Clause House year round. The town is particularly lively in December when festive tourists flock to the North Pole for the annual winter festival.

Rothenburg, Germany

This perfectly preserved medieval town is home to the world’s only Christmas museum, attracting upwards of 1.5 million visiting tourists per year. Rothenburg is perhaps best known for its legendary Christmas shop ‘Käthe Wohlfahrt’ which is open all year round and fondly known as ‘The Christmas Village’. The shop even boasts a 16-foot high real Christmas tree!

 

Can’t wait til Christmas? Reserve your real Christmas tree when our online booking service reopens in December 2017 and collect from the Old Jenners Depository in Edinburgh at a time that suits you.

In the meantime, why not pop over to Rothenburg to get your festive fix and stock up on some sparkly new decs’ for your home-bred Scottish Christmas tree?




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